News

Recent findings published by NHS Digital

This week the findings from NHS Digital’s Health Survey for England 2017 were published and reported on by various news outlets. Here we summarise just some of the findings:

Obesity and Diabetes

In 2017, 64% of adults were overweight or obese in England, men were more commonly overweight than women (40% vs 31%, respectively) while more women were obese than men (30% vs 27%, respectively). 12% of men and 9% of women with a very high waist circumference had either diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes.

In 2017, 30% of children aged 2-15 years old were overweight or obese (17% obese). Those children with obese parents were 3 times more likely to be obese than children with healthy weight parents.

Fruit and Vegetable intake

In 2017, only 29% of adults met the 5 a day recommendation (fewer men were meeting the recommendation than women) and only 18% 5-15 year olds consumed 5 portions of fruit and vegetables, the mean portion for children was 3.2.

Risk Factors

The following risk factors were also assessed by the survey:

  • smoking cigarettes 
  • drinking more than 14 units of alcohol per week
  • eating less than five portions of fruit and vegetables a day
  • obesity calculated by BMI
  • physical inactivity

36% of adults had just 1 of the above risk factors, 32% had 2 risk factors and 19% had 3 or more of the risk factors - meaning almost 90% had at least 1 risk factor.

Having multiple risk factors was more common in men than women (54% men with 2 or more risk factors vs 47% women with 2 or more risk factors).

The most common combination of risk factors for men was found to be drinking more than 14 units of alcohol per week and low fruit and vegetable intake.

The most common combination of risk factors for women was found to be low fruit and vegetable intake and obesity.

More information on the findings published by NHS Digital can be found by following the link.


6th December 2018
Prevention is key

UK Government has announced that an extra £20.5 billion a year will be given to the NHS, one of the key priorities being the prevention of ill health.  

Currently the UK spends £97 billion treating diseases but only £8 billion preventing them.

In the UK alone, nearly two thirds of adults and a quarter of children are overweight or obese increasing the risk of a variety of diseases like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Obesity-related ill health is costing the NHS £6 billion a year and £27 billion to the wider society, while the total cost of type 2 diabetes currently sits at £24 billion a year.

Yet many of the diseases putting a significant strain on our NHS are not inevitable. They can and should be prevented.

 “Prevention is about helping people stay healthy, happy and independent for as long as possible. This means reducing the chances of problems from arising in the first place and, when they do, supporting people to manage them as effectively as possible.” - Prevention is better than cure, Department of Health and Social Care, 2018

Over half of ill health and early death can be prevented through factors that can be altered (behaviours, social and environmental) to avoid the need for medical treatment.

60% of type 2 diabetes cases can be delayed or prevented through lifestyle change and 1 in 20 cancers can be prevented by a healthier diet.

Yet we live in an obesogenic environment where healthy choices aren’t always clear and easy to make. Action needs to be taken to make these choices easier to make.

“…people are spending too many years in poor health, with these gains in health not felt equally across society. But this is not inevitable; much of ill health could be prevented. Prevention is crucial to improving the health of the whole population, and helping secure the health and social care services we all value and rely on. It will also boost the health of our economy.” – Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care

A whole systems approach is key to ensuring people stay well for longer, encompassing all aspects of society from macro (Government, media, industry) to micro (knowledge, skill, availability). Enforcing clear and consistent nutrition labelling on all food and drink products; ensuring schools and workplaces serve healthy food and promote the importance of a healthy lifestyle; and working with industry to promote the reformulation of foods to provide healthier choices.

A large part of this is about giving people the knowledge and tools they need to confidently take control of their health and improve it for the better and to make healthy choices as easy as possible.

myfood24 is an online dietary assessment tool that accurately tracks, monitors and analyses nutritional intake. Initially developed for research into diet-related health conditions, myfood24 will soon be available for use in a healthcare setting. myfood24 can be used to prevent and manage diet-related diseases.

The visual and easy-to-interpret nutritional feedback produced by myfood24 will help those preventing and managing conditions to better understand the impact of their dietary choices. It also will allow health practitioners to remotely track their patient’s progress in real time and quickly see areas for improvement.

To try a free demo of the myfood24 diary, please click here.

If you're interested in using myfood24 in a healthcare setting and would like to be kept up-to-date with our progress, please get in touch.

5th December 2018
News: 7,000 under 25's with type 2 diabetes in England and Wales

GPs are already under considerable pressure. And now, according to Diabetes UK, they are also dealing with a huge increase in type 2 diabetes in children and young adults under 25.

According to recent figures from NHS Digital, diabetes prescriptions now cost the NHS over £1bn each year. Although type 2 diabetes can be hereditary, lifestyle choices, in particular diet, can play a huge role in both preventing and managing the disease.

But it's not as simple as saying "Eat less sugar and fatty foods" - people need to be able track their diet accurately and work out what is best for them. Understanding the nutritional composition of the foods they are consuming and the impact this has on their health is key to this.

GPs and other health professionals need effective tools to support their patients and deal with the rapid increase in case load. myfood24 is an online diet tracking solution that was originally designed to be used for research into a wide range of health conditions such as diabetes and cancer and will soon be available for use in healthcare. myfood24 will allow GPs, dietitians and other health professionals to accurately track their patients dietary intake in real time against their nutritional goals, and provide easy to understand feedback graphs on a wide range of nutrients.

Mark Cade, a GP at a busy practice in Bradford commented "Current options for monitoring patient diets are either too laborious or not accurate enough for medical use. New tools like myfood24 will help health practitioners deal with the huge increase in caseload of patients with type 2 diabetes and other diet-related conditions."

To try a free demo of the myfood24 diary, please click here.

If you're interested in using myfood24 in a healthcare setting and would like to be kept up-to-date with our progress, please get in contact.

28th November 2018
We need to "strengthen and expand nationally representative diet and nutrition surveys”

Janet Speaks at NUTRIMAD, Madrid 2018

Prof Janet Cade emphasised this statement from the WHO European Food and Nutrition Action Plan (2014) at the IV World Congress of Public Health Nutrition and XII Congress of the Spanish Society for Community Nutrition - NUTRIMAD 2018, held in Madrid in October 2018. She had been invited to contribute to a symposium on Dietary Surveys. Other speakers covered aspects of social determinants of food choice, useful when considering who is responding to surveys and why; and reports from some larger dietary surveys in Spain.

It is clear that across Europe improving national diet surveys should be a priority. The Nutritional Epidemiology Group in Leeds has recently been awarded the status of WHO Collaborating Centre in Nutritional Epidemiology; and work from the group has shown that 36% of countries in Europe (19/53) do NOT have a National Diet Survey, with the gaps mainly in Central and Eastern Europe. National and regional nutrition policy lacks a strong evidence base. Results for countries which do provide nutrient information, shows that overall, men and older boys have higher energy intakes than women and girls. Adult women have energy intakes below UK reference intake, though under-reporting is possible. Nutrients which are above the reference intakes were fat and sodium; with fibre and folate intakes below the reference intake level for most countries.

National diet surveys provide useful data for monitoring trends and developing evidence for policy. However, studies undertaken show little uniformity in method, with varying age groups, dietary methodologies, nutrient composition databases, time frames studied, and statistical methods used. Under-reporting appears to be common, and treatment of this by study varies.

Could new technology help?

Traditional paper-based methods have been most commonly used in nutrition surveys, despite respondent and researcher burden. However, new dietary assessment technologies offer potential advantages including faster data processing, ease of use for respondents and better data quality. 

myfood24 is one such tool, recent publication of a large validation study of this system using biomarkers showed that nutrient results were similar to those which could be obtained using the best current multiple-pass interview method. The underlying food composition database is unique and could be linked to other food coding languages across Europe. myfood24 is also available and being used in Germany and Denmark with local food composition tables, making it suitable for development across a range of countries.

Survey harmonisation is important for comparison and policy formation, use of a consistent dietary assessment tool would help this standardisation. There needs to be a balance between complexity of information captured in the survey and the cost and speed of delivering results. myfood24 provides an easy to use system for survey participants to complete without the need for interviewers, with immediate real-time feedback on food and nutrient results.


20th November 2018
Consultation: Mandatory Folic Acid Fortification for the UK

The Government has announced that it will consult on the mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid in a bid to reduce pregnancies effected by neural tube defects (NTD).

Adequate levels of folic acid are required during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy to ensure the proper formation of the foetal neural tube that connects the brain and spinal cord. Inadequate levels of folic acid before and during pregnancy have been linked to an increased risk of foetal neural tube defects (NTDs) such as anencephaly, spina bifida and encephalocele.

On 23rd October, Public Health Minister Steve Brine announced that the government would consult on making it mandatory to fortify flour with folic acid to reduce the number of NTD pregnancies. Fortification of flour with folic acid is not uncommon, if the government approves these plans the UK will fall in line with the other 80 countries, including US, Canada and Australia, where fortification is already mandatory.

Since 1991, women planning a pregnancy have been advised to take a daily 400µg folic acid supplement from pre-conception through to the end of the first trimester to reduce the risk of NTDs. However, almost half of pregnancies in the UK are unplanned meaning many are not taking supplements and therefore not receiving sufficient folic acid. According to the NDNS, 91% of women of childbearing age were below the threshold for red blood cell folate concentration, indicating an increased risk of NTDs.

According to a UK study, only a third of women take folic acid supplements before pregnancy and a European study found that less than 20% of women know that folic acid could reduce the risk of NTDs. This is reflected in the prevalence of NTD in the UK, 1.28 in 1000 pregnancies are effected (equating to 700-900 effected pregnancies each year) causing avoidable terminations, stillbirths, neonatal deaths and permanent disability. A recent modelling study suggested that mandatory fortification could prevent 200-300 NTD pregnancies each yeah in the UK.

Health ministers have been pushing for mandatory fortification for some years but it has previously been contested by the Food Standard Agency (FSA). In 2002 they had concerns over the potential masking effects fortification may have on vitamin B12 deficiency and possible increased risk of colon cancer. Since then SACN have found no significant evidence to suggest that supplementation increased the risk of cancer. Both SACN and FSA have now recommended mandatory fortification on the basis that controls on voluntary fortification should be put in place to prevent exceeding tolerable levels in certain groups.

Chief Nutritionist at Public Health England, Alison Tedstone has said: “Fortifying flour with folic acid is an effective and safe measure to reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects.”

Professor Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer for England has said:

“The evidence shows that fortifying flour with folic acid is a practical way of reducing folate deficiencies in pregnant women and reducing birth defects.”

“However, as with any intervention of this kind, we need to be certain it is also safe, and that means considering what the wider implications would be for the rest of the population who eat flour.”

“I am pleased to see the government taking action on this issue and hope to see the wider scientific community feed in their views to this important consultation which could benefit and improve the lives of many women and babies in this country.”

The consultation will take place in early 2019 and will take into consideration the evidence, practicality and safety of mandatory fortification.


31st October 2018
myfood24 Clinical Applications: Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs in 1 in 20 pregnancies and typically affects women in their third trimester. Many hormonal changes occur in pregnancy, in particular insulin-resistant hormones such as oestrogen and progesterone increase, causing elevated blood glucose levels. In order to deal with increased blood glucose, the body needs to produce more insulin. GDM occurs when the body is unable to produce enough insulin to meet the demand. GDM increases the risk of complications in pregnancy for both the mother and baby, for example: pre-eclampsia, premature birth and stillbirth. GDM can develop in any pregnant woman, but those with a BMI above 30 or with a family history of diabetes are at an increased risk. In most cases, blood glucose levels return to normal post-pregnancy, however within 5 years of giving birth 50% of women with GDM will develop type 2 diabetes.

Dietary and lifestyle changes such as exercise are recommended for treatment of GDM in order to reduce blood glucose levels. Such dietary changes include promotion of foods with a low glycaemic index and reducing portion sizes. If after 2 weeks of dietary modifications, blood glucose levels are still not within the target range (fasting: <5.3 mmol/L, 1hr after meal: <7.8 mmol/L) medication will be required for the rest of the pregnancy. The self-management of diet and glucose monitoring can be demanding and can lead to increased levels of distress.

Dietary assessment by a dietitian forms part of the standard care at diagnosis. Such forms of dietary assessment is cumbersome for both the dietitian and mother-to-be and can be subject to misinterpretation leading to inaccurate results.

myfood24 has the capacity to reduce the burden of dietary assessment and the chance of misleading results. Due to the self-reporting element and feedback provided it also has the potential to empower mothers-to-be and reduce their feelings of distress.

In a recent study looking to improve dietary habits of women newly diagnosed with GDM, myfood24 was used to assess dietary intake alongside glucose monitoring.

The women were asked to self-complete their dietary intake using myfood24 as part of the standard antenatal care. Alongside this care, the women were asked to complete a user questionnaire to assess usability (user experience, ease of understanding and ease of use) of myfood24.

Ease of Use

The study found that most women thought myfood24 was ‘straightforward’ to use. The portion images were highlighted as a particularly useful feature, as were the reminder prompts, the women felt that these features led to a more accurate account of that they’d eaten.

“I thought that [myfood24] made me remember things. It was more specific. I think it was easy to forget when you’re writing it down. You know because it reminded you –have you remembered to put a drink down here, have you remember to put a snack down there.”

Improving Health Literacy

In regards to positive impact on food choices and behaviours, the most valuable feature of myfood24 was the feedback produced. Women found that this feedback increased their knowledge of dietary intake and enabled them to understand what dietary choices and portion sizes would be more suitable.

“I was like ooh I shouldn’t have eaten that or oh, I’ve had a really good day today.”

Increasing Sense of Control

Not only did the feedback motivate women to make better choices in the future but they also felt it provided them with the reassurance they needed to make these choices, reducing their dependence on the dietitian and increasing their sense of control.

 “Once you can see it in numbers and can see the picture of it, it’s harder just to shrug off and think I’m fine… I couldn’t just go with it.”

Dietary Changes

The process of recalling their daily intake in combination with the feedback they received led them to consider dietary changes – other studies have shown that this improves uptake of self-monitoring and leads to dietary changes.

"A week's worth of days in front of you it does make you think about what you're eating and how much"

Clinical Application 

Ultimately, myfood24 could be used by women with GDM to improve their health literacy leading to increased self-efficacy and self-management skills and to improve their dietary choices and behaviours. Health practitioners could also benefit from myfood24 through a reduction in workload, this would allow more time to be spent on education and support for patients to enhance the service provided.


24th October 2018
Congratulations, Neil!

We’re very proud that our Technical Consultant, Neil Hancock, has just been announced as the Data Manager for the School of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Leeds!

Neil has worked at the school alongside Prof Janet Cade for almost 7 years on various research projects including: developing and validating myfood24, Nutritools – an interactive website designed to support dietary assessment, My Meal Mate – a weight loss app, CADET – a paper based food checklist designed for children 3-11 years old and the UK Women’s Cohort Study - one of the largest cohort studies investigating associations between diet and cancer in the UK.

Now, as the School Data Manager, Neil will be responsible for overseeing the School’s data management plans, ensuring the School is GDPR compliant and constructing and developing a range of databases alongside his consultancy work for Dietary Assessment.

Congratulations on your new role, Neil!


5th October 2018
New Research: Sugar Content of Yogurts in the UK

Researchers at the University of Leeds and Surrey have recently found that many yogurts, particularly those aimed towards children, contain high levels of sugar.

The team analysed the nutritional value of 921 products sold in 5 of the major UK supermarkets. Products were split into 8 categories: children’s (n=101), dairy alternatives (n=38), dessert (n= 161), drinks (n=70), flavoured (n=79), fruit (n=317), natural/Greek (n=61) or organic (n=71).

Those in the ‘dessert’ category were found to have the highest median sugar content (16.4 g/100 g), as to be expected. ‘Organic’ and ‘children’s’ yogurts contained 13.1 g/100 g and 10.8 g/100 g, respectively. The group with the lowest median total sugar content were ‘natural/Greek’ yogurts (5 g/100 g).

According to UK labelling guidelines, to be classed as ‘low sugar’ and therefore receive a green traffic light on front-of-pack labelling, products must contain 5 g or less of sugar per 100 g. Quite shockingly, less than 9% of products were classed as low sugar and only 2% of ‘children’s’ yogurts met this classification.

Yogurts are a good source of protein, calcium and iodine, among others, and are considered to be a healthy food, especially for babies and children. Those under the age of 3 years are the largest consumer of yogurts in the UK. However, the findings from this study suggest that while yogurts do have benefits to health, especially for a developing child, the majority are also a hidden source of sugar and could be playing a role in the increase in obesity and tooth decay in young children.

The study also identified the range of portion sizes available for both children and adults. Many in the ‘children’s’ category were in fact the same size as those marketed towards adults. Adding another layer of complexity for parent’s to navigate around.

The study highlights the need for reformulation of yogurts to contain far less sugar. It is important to note that since the products in the study were analysed, the Government has launched a ‘Sugar Reduction Programme’ with the aim to reduce the sugar content of certain products by 20 % by 2020. In the first year of the programme, the sugar content of ‘yogurts and fromage frais’ was reduced by 5 %. However, even with this reduction, many of the products analysed still would not meet the ‘low sugar’ classification, demonstrating that there is still work to do.

Parents needs to be clear on the levels of sugar found in the foods they are feeding their children but should not be put off giving their children yogurts. Instead, results should prompt parents to offer their child natural or greek yogurts with added whole fruits for sweetness, as a low sugar option whilst contributing to the recommended 5 a day.

For more information please see the University of Leeds Press release or access the paper published in BMJ Open here.


26th September 2018
Increasing the quality of calories

The British Nutrition Foundation has launched a new concept called ‘The Quality Calorie’, focusing on the nutritional quality of diets as well as the number of calories being consumed.

The British Nutrition Foundation's (BNF) concept encourages the importance of overall diet quality, ensuring that individuals are consuming the right kinds of calories – those that offer good nutritional value over those with little or none – as well as the number being consumed.

When making food choices it’s important to remember that it’s not just about the number of calories a food or a drink contains but the overall nutritional quality of the item. For example, eating 2 chocolate digestives or a lollipop contains a similar number of calories to a handful of nuts or an apple, respectively. Yet the biscuits and lollipop contain far more free sugar (and saturated fat in the biscuit’s case) than the nuts or apple, which are also a source of fibre, vitamins and minerals. By looking purely at the calorie content, one might be tempted to choose the biscuits or lollipop and avoid the more nutritionally rich foods. 

In applying The Quality Calorie (QC) concept, it is hoped that the nutritional quality of diets will improve through increased consumption of fruits, vegetables and fibre alongside vitamins and minerals like folate, iron and vitamin C and lowering consumption of free sugar, salt and saturated fat etc.

As part of the concept, the BNF has created a useful resource that encourages individuals to make healthier food choices by suggesting simple food and drink swaps and helpful tips on how to 'QC' meals. For example swapping chocolate covered cereal and whole milk, for porridge made with semi-skimmed milk, sliced banana and cinnamon - this increases B vitamins, potassium and wholegrains while reducing the amount of free sugars.

It is important to remember the role portion size plays in weight management, this shouldn’t be forgotten when ‘QC’ing’ meals and should be done so in moderation.

myfood24 provides real-time feedback on over 100 nutrients and emphasises the importance of overall diet and nutritional quality, not just focusing on calories alone. It can play an important role in helping steer people towards healthier eating options. myfood24 can be used by individuals or by dietitians and other health professionals to provide a clear picture on nutritional intake and identify areas of diet where a small change could deliver a major improvement in health.


21st September 2018
Workshop on Innovative Technologies for Dietary Intakes Measurements

This week, Prof Janet Cade from the University of Leeds and Founder of Dietary Assessment attended the first international workshop on Innovative Technologies for Dietary Intakes Measurements in London.

Researchers and students from a range of backgrounds attended the event – all of whom were actively involved in the monitoring of dietary intake, developing associated technologies or conducting research studies. Key points discussed included the need to accurately monitor dietary intake, the challenges associated with this and new technical approaches.

Prof Janet Cade also presented a poster ‘Validation and further development of myfood24: an online 24-hour dietary assessment tool’ at the event. The poster included findings from a validation study published in BMC Medicine last month.

20th September 2018
Dietary Assessment - September '18 Update

Lots of exciting things have been happening for Dietary Assessment over the past few months…

The validation paper showing that myfood24 is just as effective as the more time-consuming and costly interviewer-led recall, in comparison to biomarkers, was published in BMC medicine.

We’re very excited to announce that we have been accepted onto the Elmwood LaunchPod accelerator programme starting this month!

Ready for the start of a new academic term, we’re thrilled that a number of universities across the UK will be using myfood24 for teaching!

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“We have a valid, reliable tool for measuring diet.” – Dr D Greenwood, University of Leeds, study co-author

The latest myfood24 validation paper: ‘Validity of an online 24-h recall tool (myfood24) for dietary assessment in population studies: comparison with biomarkers and standard interviews’ was published on 9th August 2018 in BMC Medicine (DOI: 10.1186/s12916-018-1113-8).

The paper compares the performance of myfood24 with a traditional interviewer-led 24hr recall, assessing both against a suite of biomarkers. Intakes of energy and nutrients such as protein, total sugar and sodium were compared between methods. As expected, both self-reported methods were attenuated compared to biomarkers, attenuation factors for myfood24 and the interviewer-led recall were similar (0.2-0.3). The study concluded that myfood24 gave similar results to the more cumbersome and costly interviewer-led recall, therefore could be more efficient in large-scale population surveys, prospective cohorts and trials and could give more valid estimates than FFQs.

Click here to read the University of Leeds’s press release

For more information on myfood24 please click here

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Elmwood launches Dietary Assessment Ltd into healthcare

Elmwood LaunchPod, an accelerator programme run by Elmwood, a global brand design consultancy, has signed up four successful participants, including Dietary Assessment Ltd, to take part in its 12-week programme starting in September.

The accelerator is aimed at promoting the development of start-ups, offering support to entrepreneurs looking to scale-up their operations, while also investing in the economic prospects of the region. The programme will shape the direction of businesses and foster community collaboration with creativity and technology at the core. Elmwood’s inaugural programme is focused on start-ups who are innovating how people connect with their health and with the healthcare system.

“We’re really excited to work with the Elmwood team to develop the Dietary Assessment brand and look forward to developing and launching a new version of myfood24 for personalised healthcare and wellbeing.” - Lauren Gibson, Nutritionist at Dietary Assessment Ltd

Click here to read Elmwood’s press release

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myfood24 success in teaching

Launched in February 2018, myfood24 for teaching has been tailored to support classroom learning to develop critical skills and capacity in nutrition and health.

As far as we’re aware, it’s the only system that allows immediate feedback from the whole class to be explored together, without aggregating information elsewhere first. Feedback on 100+ nutrients can be analysed at both the individual and group level using a variety of visual and easy-to-interpret graphs.

We’re thrilled that it’s already being used in a number of top universities across the UK, including the University of Leeds. The latest universities to integrate myfood24 for teaching into their nutrition and related courses include: Leeds Beckett, Liverpool Hope and University of Southampton!

If you’re interested in using myfood24 for teaching or would like to find out more information, please click here

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myfood24 can be used by researchers, teaching and health professionals to accurately track, monitor and analyse nutritional intake to improve health.

For more information, please click here or contact us directly.

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Dietary Assessment Ltd – helping to reduce diet-related disease, globally.

10th September 2018
Innovative Leeds-based Accelerator Programme Helping Start-Ups to Succeed

Press release: 30th August

Elmwood LaunchPod, an accelerator programme run by Elmwood, the world’s most effective brand design consultancy, has signed up four successful participants to take part in its 12-week programme which starts in September. Engagify, Dietary Assessment Ltd and Shift.ms will join recently announced maiden entrepreneurs accepted on the first programme, DigiBete.

The accelerator is aimed at promoting the development of start-ups, offering support to entrepreneurs looking to scale-up their operations, while also investing in the economic prospects of the region. The programme will shape the direction of businesses and foster community collaboration with creativity and technology at the core. Elmwood’s inaugural programme is focused on start-ups who are innovating how people connect with their health and with the healthcare system. 

Each week, participants will receive specialist insight from a world-class community of marketers and creative designers and free workspace at Elmwood’s creative and dynamic studio in Leeds (United Kingdom). The programme will cover areas that include a series of group-based workshops, 1:1 coaching and support from experts and mentoring in a real setting in collaboration with Elmwood and its partners. 

Sarah Dear, managing partner at Elmwood and managing director of Elmwood LaunchPod, commented: “We are excited to welcome an amazing group of talented entrepreneurs who share Elmwood’s passion for innovative thinking and design. These organisations are using creativity and technology to address real health problems and shape the future of healthcare and consumer health experiences. Working collaboratively, we can support the drive and commitment these entrepreneurs possess and help them scale up and reach their next level of growth.” 

About Elmwood LaunchPod

The future starts with an idea. And some of the most innovative ideas are found among start-up businesses. But to make them viable, they need to be nurtured, tested and refined. Elmwood LaunchPod is an accelerator program that invites start-ups into a creative community for 12 weeks, where access to expert mentoring, growth networks and in some cases, funding are provided.

Based in Leeds and managed by global brand experience agency, Elmwood, Elmwood LaunchPod offers start-up companies access to Elmwood’s roster of industry-leading global clients and world-class community of marketers and creative designers. These start-ups will be amongst science, technology, engineering and creative industries.  

This is a unique project bringing together businesses with breakthrough ideas propelled by the power of design. This is where the future starts and business takes off. 

For more information visit launchpod.elmwood.com or follow Elmwood LaunchPod on social media 

About Elmwood 

Elmwood is the world’s most effective brand design and brand experience consultancy. A bold statement, but true. We’ve won more DBA Design Effectiveness Awards than anyone else in the history of the scheme, recognition of our work’s commercial success. Elmwood began in 1977, and has studios in Leeds, London, New York, Singapore, and Melbourne. Today, Elmwood is still very much independent, offering industry leading services in brand strategy and insight, brand identity; creative, design and activation; branded content and experience; and consulting. We can tick off a long list of sectors including retail, government, sport, media, FMCG, B2B and more. Our joint ventures also mean we can offer specialist services in sustainability consulting, industrial design and environmental design. We’ve been accredited a 'Silver' standard by Investors in People and made the Sunday Times ‘Best 100 Companies to Work For’ in 2008 and 2011.

For more information, visit www.elmwood.com   

30th August 2018
myfood24 provides more efficient way for professionals to monitor diet

Press Release: 9th August 2018

Research carried out to prove the validity myfood24  has shown it is as effective as similar tools already available to health care practitioners, researchers and educators, and more efficient to use.

Users of myfood24, the flagship solution by Dietary Assessment Ltd, a spin out company from the University of Leeds, can record their food and drink intake by selecting items and portion sizes from the extensive database.

The expertly crafted and unique database has been created by mapping commercial ‘back of pack’ food label data like energy, fibre and fat from branded items to UK food composition tables to provide over 100 additional nutrients. Reports are generated in real time and give a comprehensive breakdown of attributes like vitamins and minerals.

The academics who developed myfood24 carried out the latest round of research to compare its performance with the traditional interviewer-administered dietary survey and to check it was providing the same quality of data for clinicians as traditional surveying and biomarker evidence.

The results of the study have been independently peer reviewed and are published in the academic journal BMC Medicine. More than 200 adults recorded 24 hours of data three times over a month, using myfood24, alongside an existing interviewer-administered dietary assessment method to achieve an estimate of longer-term diet.

The results gathered from both myfood24 and from the standard interview-led method were then assessed against biomarkers taken from urine samples which acted as the gold standard measures for protein, potassium, sodium, sugars, vitamin C, vitamin E and β-carotene. To measure energy, the researchers compared total energy intake to an objective measure of total energy expenditure, using accelerometers.

Professor Janet Cade, Head of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group at the University’s School of Food Science and Nutrition, said: “We were pleased to find the evidence showed that myfood24 gave broadly similar answers to the interviewer-based dietary recall with which many NHS staff would be familiar but which takes longer to use and is less efficient for workers.

“We would not expect either of the tools to agree exactly with the biomarkers as these provide very precise measures of nutrient availability in the body and often beyond that which can be achieved by dietary assessments. Proving that myfood24 gives similar levels of detail to long-standing methods of dietary examination opens the prospect of hospitals and GPs adopting it to save time and free up staff to carry out other work.”

Dr Darren Greenwood, Senior Lecturer in Biostatistics at the University, added: “Our findings show myfood24’s results are comparable to the more time-consuming and costly interviewer-based approach across a range of measures. Ultimately, myfood24 was compared to gold standard measures of nutrients in the blood and it passed the test: We have a valid, reliable tool for measuring diet.”

myfood24 has already been used to measure people’s dietary intake in an efficient and reliable manner by more than 20 organisations, including some in Germany, Denmark and Australia where country-specific versions have been created.

It was developed by the researchers to support academic research into dietary intake and diet-related disease. myfood24 has wide application in research, education and clinical use.

A version designed to support classroom learning is currently in use on degree courses in several universities.

The team are currently tailoring myfood24 to clinical settings such as the NHS to be used by health professionals to quickly and accurately measure diet. The aim is to empower patients to better self-manage health conditions, improve their health literacy lead to the prevention of diet-related disease.

Diet is linked to a wide range of diseases, accurately measuring the nutritional value of an individual’s consumption can help to devise healthy eating plans and advance dietary research.

Additional information

The development and validation of myfood24 was funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC-G1100235). In early 2017, a spinout company called Dietary Assessment Ltd was created in order to continue the development of myfood24 and respond to a growing range of customer requirements.

The paper: "Validity of an online 24-h recall tool (myfood24) for dietary assessment in population studies: comparison with biomarkers and standard interviews" is published in BMC Medicine (DOI: 10.1186/s12916-018-1113-8)

Additional authors include: Petra A. Wark, Laura J. Hardie, Gary S. Frost, Nisreen A. Alwan, Michelle Carter, Paul Elliott, Heather E. Ford, Neil Hancock, Michelle A. Morris, Umme Z. Mulla, Essra A. Noorwali, K. Petropoulou, David Murphy, Gregory D. M. Potter, Elio Riboli

About the University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 33,000 students from more than 150 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

We are a top ten university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, and are in the top 100 of the QS World University Rankings 2019. Additionally, the University was awarded a Gold rating by the Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework in 2017, recognising its ‘consistently outstanding’ teaching and learning provision. Twenty-six of our academics have been awarded National Teaching Fellowships – more than any other institution in England, Northern Ireland and Wales – reflecting the excellence of our teaching. www.leeds.ac.uk 

About Dietary Assessment Ltd

Dietary Assessment’s vision is to help reduce diet-related disease, globally. In order to achieve this we are helping researchers, teaching and health professionals to better track, monitor and analyse nutritional intake to improve health. The Company’s flagship solution, myfood24, is being used by a growing number of organisations across the UK, Europe and Australasia.

9th August 2018
Blog: Childhood Obesity: Time for action

According to a recent report by the House of Commons Health Committee on childhood obesity, nearly a third of children aged 2 to 15 are overweight or obese in the UK and younger generations are becoming obese at earlier ages and staying obese for longer.

By the age of 10-11, 22% of boys and 18% of girls are obese. This makes depressing reading. What is clear from the report is that there is no single or easy fix; rather a wide ranging plan is needed to tackle areas such as food advertising and to promote early years education and the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

The report emphasises the need for a ‘whole systems’ approach with joint working between national and local Government, families and communities, third sector groups, schools, healthcare professionals, industry and academia.

Effective monitoring of diet is a key component of this. This is not just calorie counting but a focus on the quality of our diets. Are we getting enough vitamins and minerals? What about fibre?

Tools such as myfood24  can play an important role in helping steer people towards healthier eating options. Developed within the University of Leeds and now supported by spinout company Dietary Assessment, myfood24 provides real-time feedback about diet across over 100 nutrients. It can be used by individuals or by dietitians and other health professionals to provide a clear picture on nutritional intake and identify areas of diet where a small change could deliver a major improvement in health.

As identified in the report, education has a key role to play in reducing the prevalence of obesity. We need to get beyond the headline that majors on the quantity of food we are eating and make the shift towards a greater focus on the quality of our diets. Healthier eating will not just reduce obesity but will deliver a range of other health benefits too.

Blog by Steve Kerridge



29th June 2018
myfood24 is being used to measure dietary intake in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

A longitudinal survey of over 58,000 women in Australia is using myfood24 to recall dietary data

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), previously known as Women's Health Australia, assesses many aspects of women's health across the lifespan and factors that can influence these. The study examines aspects such as: physical and emotional health including major diagnosis; use of health services for example GP; health behaviors and risk factors like diet and exercise; and others. The overall aim of the study is to shape the future of women's health in Australia.

Surveys began in 1996 where 3 cohorts aged 18-23, 45-50 and 70-75 years were surveyed and a new cohort of over 17,000 18-23 year old women was then formed in 2012/13. Since its creation, ALSWH has provided rich and unique data that has subsequently been used by the Australian government, among other bodies, to develop and evaluate national policies and practices.

Participants of the 1989-95 cohort were asked to complete a 24hr dietary recall using myfood24 as part of Survey 4 to allow researchers to further investigate the links between diet and the health and wellbeing of the Australian women. 

myfood24 enabled participants to accurately record their dietary intake by selecting foods and portion sizes from the unique and vast dataset and adding them to their food diary. After completion, participants received a personal summary of their nutritional intake (including energy, fat and sugar) with a comparison against that of an average Australian woman.

A short summary of the dietary data from the 1989-95 cohort, using myfood24, has recently been published in Report 40 of the Technical Reports and compares results with the 1973-78 cohort.

The ALSWH is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.

5th June 2018
New research into diet-related disease

Over the last month, there has been some interesting research into diet-related disease. The first mentioned below, is an exciting new study looking into the links between common dietary patterns and the risk of colon and rectum cancer. The second provides new data and reviews current evidence on the importance of maternal health at preconception. Both studies highlight the need for accurate and reliable dietary assessment.

Common dietary patterns and risk of colon and rectum cancer - larger studies needed

Currently, there is inconsistent evidence to suggest that low meat or vegetarian diets are associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Hence researchers from the Nutritional Epidemiology Group at the University of Leeds, led by Diego Rada-Fernandez de Jauregui, MD, analysed data from 32,147 women from the UK Women's Cohort Study to evaluate the relationship between common dietary patterns and incidence of colon and rectum cancer. 

The study is one of the few to assess whether red meat, poultry, fish and vegetarian dietary patterns are associated with CRC. A 217-item Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to identify four common dietary patterns based on a hierarchy of consumption of red meat, poultry and fish. 

The study found that when comparing grouped red meat free diets with red meat containing diets, there was no significant reduction in risk of overall CRC, colon cancer or rectal cancer. However, it found that there was a statistically significant reduction in risk of distal colon cancer in grouped red meat free diets, although numbers were small. Results suggest that larger studies should be conducted to investigate the protective association of red meat free diets on CRC.

"Our study not only helps shed light on how meat consumption may affect the sections of the colorectum differently, it emphasizes the importance of reliable dietary reporting from large groups of people." - Prof Janet Cade, RNutr, FAfN, Head of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group at the University of Leeds and Founder of Dietary Assessment Ltd.

The importance of optimal nutrition during preconception

The life-course approach suggests that during a person's life there are several critical stages that can have a long-term effect on health. Preconception is a critical period, if maternal nutrition is not optimised it could have deleterious effects on the health of the mother, the child and subsequent generations. For example, low maternal levels of folic acid could lead to neural tube defects.

A paper, published in the Lancet led by Judith Stephenson, suggests that it is not enough to correct maternal deficiencies through supplementation during pregnancy and highlights the importance of optimal nutrition during preconception. The study calls for an increase in awareness of the importance of nutrition during preconception to improve maternal, foetal and child health. The author writes that a "dual strategy" is required to improve nutritional status in those women thinking of conceiving, of reproductive age and more broadly across the life-course.




8th May 2018
University of Leeds uses new dietary assessment tool for student teaching

Press Release:  5th February 2018.

The University of Leeds has signed an agreement with Dietary Assessment Ltd to use its new online food diary solution to support a range of undergraduate and graduate courses across the University.

The University will use myfood24 For Teaching, which has been developed to support classroom teaching to study the effects of diet on health. Covering a wide range of generic and branded foods and over 100 macronutrients and micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals, myfood24 For Teaching provides a quick and easy to use tool to track, monitor and analyse nutritional intake.

According to NHS Choices, obesity levels in the UK have more than trebled in the last 30 years with one in four British adults now obese. myfood24 for Teaching will help educate future generations about the impact of diet on their health and help them better understand how nutrition influences physiological, exercise, medical/healthcare and other related systems.

With support and lesson plans available, students can enter their own or others’ dietary intake and see immediate feedback. Results can be analysed in classroom sessions or subsequent personal study. Students can also use the solution for project work, to build a deeper understanding of how food and nutrient intake links to a range of health outcomes.

Professor Alan Mackie, Head of School at the School of Food Science & Nutrition at the University of Leeds commented: “We needed a tool to help teach students about the relationship between dietary intake and health. myfood24 For Teaching provides a highly practical way for students to learn about nutrition and will be used across a number of courses in nutrition and food science.”

Steve Kerridge, Managing Director of Dietary Assessment Ltd, said: “We are delighted that the University of Leeds will be using our new solution to support student education. myfood24 For Teaching has been designed to support the development of critical skills and capacity in nutrition and diet monitoring and will help teach students about the impact of diet on health.”

Further information:

Please contact Sarah Beer at Dietary Assessment Ltd (s.l.beer@myfood24.org) for further information.

About University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 33,000 students from 147 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

We are a top 10 university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework and we are The Times and The Sunday Times University of the Year 2017. Additionally, the University has been awarded a gold rating by the Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework recognising its ‘consistently outstanding’ teaching and learning provision.

About Dietary Assessment Ltd

Dietary Assessment’s vision is to help individuals, researchers, teachers and health practitioners to better track, monitor and improve diets and, ultimately, to reduce the incidence of diet-related disease across the globe. The Company’s flagship solution, myfood24, is being used by a growing number of organisations across the UK, Europe and Australasia.


5th February 2018
myfood24 at the Public Health Science conference - November 2017

Following the success of the NNEdPro summer meeting in July, Sarah Beer from myfood24 attended the Public Health Science conference in London in November alongside another project out of the University of Leeds Epidemiology Group, Nutritools.

The conference organised by The Lancet is dedicated to new research in UK public health with sessions including creativity and innovation, new methodological approaches, and implementing in policy and practice. There were also 85 poster presentations covering a range of topics, including two by Nisreen Alwan who is a University of Leeds alumna and member of the DIET@NET partnership steering group which developed Nutritools.

4th December 2017
It's been a busy few months

The myfood24 team has been busy over the last few months. Professor Janet Cade has demonstrated the system and spoken about its development and potential at meetings in Cambridge, UK; Brussels, Belgium; and Karlsruhe, Germany.

We also had a stand at The Need for Nutrition Education / Innovation Programme (NNEdPro) summer meeting. The focus of the NNEdPro organisation is advancing and implementing nutrition knowledge to improve health, wellbeing and society. These are also aims of Dietary Assessment Ltd, through the application of myfood24. We will also have a presence at the Lancet, Public Health Science Conference in London on 24th November.

Janet also spoke at the Max Rubner Conference in Germany contributing to their theme of Nutrition Monitoring – challenges and developments. She particularly emphasised online surveys which are gaining in acceptance. We have found that when checking accuracy, comparisons between online and interview-based surveys deliver similar results. Against the backdrop of a highly dynamic food market, one of the challenges is, however, to maintain the efforts required to capture the relevant food and nutrient information.

Janet was also able to mention the need for high quality measures of food intake in the House of Lords at a meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Food and Health Forum focusing on Nutrition and Cancer. myfood24 is noted in the minutes of this meeting.

20th November 2017
Scientists at the University of Bonn are looking for volunteers

How balanced is a typical breakfast in Germany? Does the population absorb enough omega-3 fatty acids? Which factors favor diabetes? If you want to get answers to such questions, you have to ask a lot of people about their dietary habits. Scientists from the Universities of Bonn...

Click here to read on   https://www.uni-bonn.de/neues/215-2017.

25th September 2017
University of Leeds spinout measures dietary intake in Germany

Release date: 26 July 2017

Dietary Assessment Ltd, a recent spinout company from the University of Leeds, has signed an agreement with the University of Bonn to support its research into dietary intake. The University will use myfood24, an online food diary solution, to support a range of projects into the effects of diet on health.

myfood24 allows researchers, teachers, health professionals and dietitians to monitor diet and analyse food and drink consumption to help understand the cause and management of diet-related diseases. Covering a wide range of generic and branded foods and over 100 macronutrients and micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals, myfood24 provides a quick and easy to use tool to track, monitor and analyse nutritional intake.

Translated into German and with a new German food and nutrient database, myfood24 will provide the University of Bonn with real-time feedback on food and nutrient intake.

Professor Dr. Ute Nöthlings from the University of Bonn said: “We needed a tool to support a range of studies into dietary intake. myfood24 now is to our knowledge the first web-based solution for a self-administered 24hour-dietary recall allowing the assessment of German dietary habits.”

Steve Kerridge, Managing Director of Dietary Assessment Ltd, said: “We are delighted to announce this partnership with the University of Bonn. We have worked closely with Professor Dr. Ute Nöthlings and her colleagues to develop a version of myfood24 for the German market and it is great to see this being launched now. The University will use myfood24 to support its own studies and we will also work together to build a community of organisations across Germany using myfood24 to support their research into diet-related disease.”

Dr. Luke Watson from the University of Leeds Research and Innovation Services added: “It is fantastic to see Dietary Assessment Ltd expanding into new international markets. Clearly there is global interest in the impact of diet on our health. myfood24 provides a proven solution that meets the academic rigour demanded by world-class research projects.”

University of Bonn and Dietary Assessment Ltd will work together to develop a collaborative hub in Germany of organisations using myfood24 to support their dietary assessment needs.

Further information:

Please contact Sarah Beer for further information at s.l.beer@myfood24.org. 

About University of Bonn

The University of Bonn is one of the world's leading research based universities and therefore it is no surprise that we operate on an international level. We particularly specialize in the fields of research and teaching and this has led to our evolving into the position of a truly prominent international institution. The University of Bonn was founded almost 200 years ago and is considered to be one of Germany's and indeed Europe's most important institutes of higher education. As home of learning to over 34,000 students, we enjoy an outstanding reputation both at home and abroad.

For more information please visit https://www.uni-bonn.de/the-university. 

About Dietary Assessment Ltd

Originally conceived in the School of Food Science & Nutrition at the University of Leeds, myfood24 was developed to support academic research into dietary intake. The development and validation of myfood24 was funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council. In early 2017, a spinout company called Dietary Assessment Ltd was created in order to continue the development of myfood24 and respond to a growing range of customer requirements.

For more information please visit www.myfood24.org.



26th July 2017
Leading Danish cancer charity to analyse food and drink consumption with myfood24

Leading Danish cancer charity to use dietary assessment tool developed by University of Leeds

Release date: 12 July 2017

Danish Cancer Society, the largest disease-fighting organisation in Denmark, has chosen an online dietary assessment tool called myfood24 to help monitor diet and analyse food and drink consumption in its large cohort ‘Diet, Cancer and Health – Next Generations’.

Developed at the University of Leeds and now supported by spinout company, Dietary Assessment Ltd, myfood24 allows researchers, teachers, health professionals and dietitians to monitor diet and analyse food and drink consumption to help understanding the cause and management of diet-related diseases.

The ability to accurately estimate dietary intake is fundamental to nutritional epidemiology. myfood24 was created to provide an easy to use, online solution that would stand up to the academic rigour demanded by world-class research projects.

The Danish Cancer Society Research Centre Head of Research Professor Anne Tjønneland will be using myfood24 to support the Society’s ‘Diet, Cancer and Health - Next Generations’ project.

She said: “We have been working with the myfood24 team to develop a version for Denmark and we are delighted to be able to announce its launch. We will be using it to support our Next Generations project where we will be studying the dietary intake of approx. 50,000 participants. We will also be working closely with Dietary Assessment Ltd to support the adoption of myfood24 by other organisations across Denmark.”

Professor Janet Cade, Professor of Nutritional Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Leeds and founder of Dietary Assessment Ltd, said: “This ambitious project established by Anne and her colleagues at the Danish Cancer Society Research Centre can only be realised using new technology such as offered by myfood24. We developed myfood24 to support our vision of reducing the incidence of diet-related disease across the globe. The Danish Cancer Society’s Next Generations project will provide world class evidence linking food and health.”

Danish Cancer Society Research Centre joins a growing international community of organisations using myfood24 to support their dietary assessment needs.

Further information:

Please contact Sarah Beer for further information at s.l.beer@myfood24.org.

About Danish Cancer Society

The Danish Cancer Society’s vision is for a life without cancer. For this purpose the Society works towards: Reducing the number of cancer cases, increasing the cancer survival rate, and improving life with cancer.

With about 430,000 members, the work of the Society falls into three main categories: Research, prevent and patient support. The Society supports and actively promotes the collection of research-based knowledge in areas where cancer patients require particular attention. The Society’s research department is internationally recognised and contributes to a strong research climate in Denmark. The Society also provides financial support to the best Danish cancer research projects. For more information please visit www.cancer.dk. 

About Dietary Assessment Ltd

Originally conceived in the School of Food Science & Nutrition at the University of Leeds, myfood24 was developed to support academic research into dietary intake. The development and validation of myfood24 was funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council. In early 2017, a spinout company called Dietary Assessment Ltd was created in order to continue the development of myfood24 and respond to a growing range of customer requirements.

For more information please visit www.myfood24.org. 

University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 33,000 students from 147 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

We are a top 10 university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework and we are The Times and The Sunday Times University of the Year 2017. Additionally, the University has been awarded a gold rating by the Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework recognising its ‘consistently outstanding’ teaching and learning provision.


12th July 2017
How do we really know we are getting the right nutrition?

We all know that most people could improve the quality of their diet. But how should we do that and how do we really know whether our food intake is providing us with optimal nutrition?

In general we don’t eat the recommended five-a-day portions of fruit and vegetables – let alone seven, as has recently been suggested. According to the National Diet and Nutrition Survey, only 27% of adults aged 19-64 years are meeting the five-a-day recommendation. The figure for children aged 11-18 years is even lower at 8%.

But it’s not just about fruit and veg. We do not consume adequate amounts of oily fish. Diets are also often too high in saturated fats, red and processed meat and sugars added to foods and fruit juice, and too low in fibre and some key vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A and iron.

Even if we cook from scratch, food cooked at home is not necessarily better nutritionally than pre-prepared meals, as discussed recently by Professor Cade, founder of Dietary Assessment Ltd, on Radio 4’s You and Yours. Many adults in both in the UK and the US are obese or overweight. There could be serious implications for long-term health as a result of our usual eating patterns.

To help keep track of how much energy and nutrients are being provided by our food we developed myfood24, an online dietary assessment tool. This new tool supports accurate, detailed recording of food and nutrient intake by researchers, but which can also support patients with diet-related conditions, sports enthusiasts, families with “picky” eaters and others. With data on 40,000 nutrients, it includes the largest complete food composition table in the UK, and possibly the world. A recent feature in The Conversation provides more detail on how we can make regular use of dietary monitoring to help us ensure that our food and nutrient intakes are also healthy.

9th May 2017
Radio 4 You and Yours: Cooking from Scratch

Professor Janet Cade, founder of Dietary Assessment Ltd, shares her thoughts on healthy eating on Radio 4's You and Yours programme. Click on the link below to listen to the podcast...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08j99mn 


27th March 2017
The Independent: Health & Families

Accuracy is a big problem when people self-report what they eat. A new online tool could help researchers and clinicians overcome this hurdle.

Click on the link below to read more...

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/the-online-tool-that-can-track-monitor-and-analyse-nutritional-intake-a7634896.html 




20th March 2017
The Conversation: The online tool that can track, monitor and analyse nutritional intake

We all know that most people could improve the quality of their diet. Most of us do not eat the recommended five-a-day portions of fruit and vegetables – let alone seven or even ten, as some have suggested. Nor do we consume adequate amounts of oily fish.

Click on the link below to read more...

https://theconversation.com/the-online-tool-that-can-track-monitor-and-analyse-nutritional-intake-73814 


 

16th March 2017
Leeds develops appetite for dietary assessment

Leeds University has spun out Dietary Assessment with an initial investment from the institution's Enterprise Fund. 

http://www.globaluniversityventuring.com/article.php/5675/leeds-develops-appetite-for-dietary-assessment 


9th February 2017
Leeds spin-out tackles diet-related disease
2nd February 2017
New spin-out firm tackles diet-related disease

According to Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, we are now spending more on treating obesity related conditions than on the police or fire service. NHS England estimates that about £16 billion a year is spent on the direct medical costs of diabetes and conditions related to being overweight or obese. 

myfood24 was created to help tackle this challenge. Click on the link below to find out more:

https://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3982/new_spin-out_firm_tackles_diet-related_disease


1st February 2017
myfood24 - The online tool helping researchers get teenage kicks

An online method of collecting diet data could help unlock intake information for teenagers, a group often neglected in government policy, say UK researchers.

Click on the link below to read more...

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Research/myfood24-the-online-tool-helping-researchers-get-teenage-kicks


16th March 2016
Validation of myfood24

myfood24 Is an online 24-h dietary assessment method developed to meet the need for an accurate national online dietary assessment tool.

Click on the link below to find out more...

http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/94160/ 


15th March 2016
Research project: A UK on-line 24h dietary recall tool for population studies

The aim of the project is to design a new online method to collect dietary intake, assess its validity and feasibility and compare it to the traditional methods of measuring diet to see if the new method is comparable or better.

Click on the link below to find out more...

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/medicine/academic_units/projects/myfood24.page#project_overview 


1st December 2015
Development and usability of myfood24: an online 24-hour dietary assessment tool

Dietary assessment in large scale population studies presents challenges to the researcher.

Click here to read more...

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283910884_Development_and_usability_of_myfood24_an_online_24-hour_dietary_assessment_tool 


1st September 2015